Bagan

(formerly Pagan)

Age: founded in 1044 AD
Area: 118.4 km²
Population: 6.166 million
Location: Latitude 21° 10' N. Longitude 94° 51' E
Temperature: Min 10°C - Max 43°C

 

Myanmar Bagan

 

 

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Mingalazedi

info Mingalazedi ('Blessing Stupa') was built in 1277 by Narathihapati. It was the very last of the large Late period monuments to be built before the kingdom's decline, thus representing the final flowering of Bagan's architectural skills.
 

Getting Around in Bagan

info Horse carts are popular ways travelling around Bagan. Visitors can also hire bicycles at some hotels and guest houses to roam around. The charges are taken per hour service. Ferry boats can also be hired to flow in the Ayeyarwaddy. The ferry stand is near the Bu Pagoda. The views from the Ayeyarwaddy is also an interesting way to explore Bagan. 
 

Ahlodawpyae Pagoda

Ahlodawpyae Pagoda
info Located between the new Bagan and the village of Bagan, this temple is style of tradition between the first period and the intermediate period. It still expresses traces of the Pyu culture,with the stupa placed on the superstructure, which preceded the arrival by Sikkhara as in Nat Hlaung Kyaung then then in Nanpaya, the first temples of briques.
 

General Information of Bagan

info Today, Bagan has many hotels and guest houses to stay in. Most popular ones are Bagan Thiripyitsaya Sakura, The Hotel@Tharabar Gate, Kumudra Hotel and many more.    
 

Bu Paya (or) Bu Pagoda

info Bu Paya is said to be known to be constructed during the 9th Century, about 850 AD. It is situated on the bank of the Ayeyarwaddy River. It is a cylindrical shaped Pyu-style pagoda and is said to be the oldest among many temples in Bagan. Bupaya was completely destroyed when it tumbled into the river in the 1975 earthquake,
 

Seinnyet Nyima & Seinnyet Ama Paya

Seinnyet Nyima & Seinnyet Ama Paya
 

Myoe Daung Monastery

info The main monastery building with an east-west orientation, is approximately 130ft (40m) x 115ft (35m). Most of its significant elements are from the pre-colonial Kone Baung period; some of the rooms were rebuilt.
 

Salay

info Salay is about 120km from Bagan to the south. Kyauk Padaung and Chauk are the towns on the way to Salay from Bagan. It is a day-trip from Bagan. Salay is a popular place in Myanmar because it is the historic home of the famous Salay U Ponya, a Bagan Era writer/poet whose work are well-known all over the country.
 

Shwezigon Pagoda

info Shwezigon is situated between the village of Wetkyi-in and Nyaung U. It was first built by King Anaweahta then completed by Kyansittha (1084-1113). Shwezigon enshrines one of the four replicas of the Buddha tooth from Sri Lanka.
 

Dhammayazika Pagoda

info Built in 1196 by Narapatisithu, the stupa rises from three five-sided terraces. Five small temples, each containing a Buddha image, encircle the terraces; some of them bear interior murals added during the Konbaung era. An outer wall also has five gateways. This circular pagoda is similar to the Shwezigon or the Mingalazedi, but has an unusual and rather complex design.
 

Ananda Pagoda

info Ananda Pagoda also known as Ananda Pahto, is estimated to be a monument of the early 12th Century. It is one of the finest, largest, best preserved and most revered of the Bagan Pagodas. This pagoda was donated and built by King Kyansitthar in the early Bagan Period. 
 

Manuha Pagoda

info Manuha was named after the Mon king from Thaton who was held captive in Bagan by Anawrahta. Legend says that Manuha was allowed to build this temple in 1059, and that he constructed it to represent his displeasure at captivity.
 

Dhammayangyi

Dhammayangyi Pagoda is the most massive-looking temples in Bagan. It was built in late 12th century by King Narathu (1167-1170).
 

Hnget Pyit Taung

info Hnget Pyit Taung meaning "The hill of the cut down bird". This place also refers to the legends of the king who killed the bird ogre is one of most significant historical monument.Several monasteries were grouped and the unit is called today, the brick monastery of Shin Arahan. It is thus on this ignored site, that the most beautiful page of the history of Bagan opened. It was also history of the introduction of Theravada Buddhism.
 

Tu Yin Taung Pagoda

Photo Credit - www.forevertop.asia
 
info Tuyin Taung or the Tuyin hill is located on the eastern side of the Ayeyarwaddy River bank of Bagan.
 

Htilominlo Pagoda

info This large temple was built by King Nantaungmya in 1218. Situated close to the road between Nyaung U and Bagan. The name is a misreading of the Pali word for 'Blessings of the Three Worlds'. Nantaungmya erected the temple on this spot because it was here that he was chosen, from among five brothers, to be the crown prince.
 

Bagan Museum

info The new Bagan Museum glorifies the golden age of Burman culture, those 250 years during which thousands of temples were built in and around the Myanmar capital of Bagan. The builders of Bagan apparently reserved brick for religious monuments for nothing remains of the other buildings, that must have been wooden, in this great capital.
 

Gadawtpalin Pagoda

info This pagoda is take to be built between late 12th century to early 13th century. Also it was started by one king and ended by another. The first king to have started this construction was Narapatisithu and finished by King Nadaungmya (1211 to 1234). The name literally means 'Platform to which Homage is Paid'.
 

Popa

info Inland the country rises in gently undulating slopes. The most noticeable feature is Popa Hill, or the Mt. Popa, an extinct volcano, to the south-east. The highest peak is 1518 metres (4,981 feet) above sea-level. The volcano is known to be extinct since 250,000 years.
 

Gubyaukgyi (Myinkaba)

info Gubyaukgyi is sometimes called "Myinkaba Gubyaukgyi" because of the resembling name of another pagoda in Wet-Kyi In. It is situated just to the left of the road on entering Myinkaba. this temple was built in 1113 by Kyansittha's son Rajakumar, on his father's death.
 

Glazed plaque

Photo Credit - www.bagandaytours.com
 
Glazed plaques depicting various nat figures paying homage with flowers and other offerings can be seen at Ananda and Mingalar pagodas. Those at Ananda are encrypted with Mon-language script, while the ones at Mingalar show Myanmar inscriptions. Visitors to Damayazika, Shwe Pat Leik, Ananda and Mingalar pagodas can see ceramic tiles depicting episodes from the 550 past lives of Glazed plaque the Buddha.
 

Shwesandaw Pagoda

 
info Shwesandaw Pagoda was built by King Anawrahta during the late 11th Century. This monument has five terraces with terracotta plaques showing the scenes from the jatakas. The zedi bell rises from two octagonal bases which top the five square terraces.
 

Pakkoku

Photo Credit - www.bookingyourtravel.com
 info On the other side of the Ayeyarwaddy River, lies this town, near Bagan. Pakkoku is well-known for the production of Tobacco. Other than Tobacco plantation, it also produces palm sugar jaggery, thanakha logs, longyis and blankets called "Anyar Saung". Pakkoku is accessible from Mandalay by car and by ferry boat.
 

Lawkananda Pagoda

info Lawkananda Pagoda was built in 1059 by Anawrahta, who is also credited with the Petleik payas. It is still used as an everyday place of worship and is thought to house an important Buddha-tooth replica.The riverside and sunset views from Lawkananda are very good.
 

Bagan Information

History
Bagan, formerly spelled as Pagan, dates back almost to the beginning of the Christian Era. It lies on the bend of the Ayeyarwaddy River. Bagan can be marked to have started with King Anawrahta. He ascended the throne of Bagan in 1044. At that time, the kingdom was under the Mahayana religion. After Shin Arahan's arrival to Bagan, it converted to Theravada Buddhism. It was said to be that each and every household was able to donate an enshrined Pagoda, because of their faith in Buddhism believe and also because of their wealth. The great Shwezigon was one of King Anawrahta's donation during his time.
 

Thatbyinnyu Pagoda

info Thatbyinnyu Pagoda is remarked to be constructed during the mid 12th century and built by King Alaung Sithu. It rises up to 61 metres.Its monumental size and verticality make it a classic example of Bagan's Middle period. Indentations for 539 jataka plaques encircle the terraces.
 

Bagan Murals

There are more than 3000 religious buildings still standing in the Bagan historical zone. After almost 1000 years, these monuments still contain more than 200,000 square feet of religious murals.
 

Tharabar Gateway

info Tharabar is derived from the Pali term “Sarabhanga” meaning “Shield Against Arrows.”This gateway is what remains of the royal city of Bagan founded by King Pyinbya in A.D 9th century, of the walls of the fourth City of Bagan that the king built in A.D 849.
 

The magical beads of pyu

photo credit - www.beadcollector.net
The types of beads that Pyu people wore include, patterns like tiger pictured beads, pictures
of elephant and pig while there are patterns like cylinder shaped beads of red, black or green colors.
 

Myazedi Pagoda

info Myazedi Pagoda is located between Myinkaba and Bagan. Myazedi meaning "Jade Pagoda" in Myanmar. From Myazedi, two identical pillars were found to have the same inscriptions on each face. Now, one of these pillars are in the Bagan Museum and the other one is under some shelter close to the Myazedi.